Massachusetts Association for Occupational Therapy

MAOT BUSINESS MEETING AND AWARD CEREMONY 8:00 AM – 8:45 AM

Educational Level:  All

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify MAOT’s professional activities over the past year.

2.     Learn about professional opportunities available for future participation with MAOT.

3.    Enhance awareness of the professional responsibility and benefits of MAOT membership.

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE - 8:45 AM – 9:15 AM

Presenter:  Lisa Simonetti, MAOT Lobbyist

Educational Level:  All

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify legislative issues that affect occupational therapy practitioners in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and at the federal level.

2.     Identify methods to become involved in state legislative issues.

Keynote Address:  9:15 am – 10:15 am

“A Fork in the Road: An Occupational Hazard?”  

Presenter: Glen Gillen, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Educational Level:  All

This lecture will explore contemporary evidence-based practice in relation to our historical roots and growth as a profession. It will trace our profession’s voyage away from and return to authentic occupation-based therapy. Lessons we have learned and mistakes we have made on this voyage give us the potential to become the art and science driven and evidence-based profession we strive to be.

Learning Objectives: By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Discuss two examples of contemporary occupational therapy evidence-based. practice in relation to occupational therapy’s historical roots.

2.     Describe what is meant by “authentic occupational therapy.”

SESSION I:  10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

A.     Impact of a Fieldwork Experience on Attitudes toward People with Intellectual Disabilities

Presenter:  Allison F. Sullivan, DOT, OTR/L; American International College

Educational Level:  All

Facilitating positive changes in attitudes of health professional students is a crucial step toward improving health care received by marginalized citizens. The purpose of this study was to describe effects of curriculum activities on attitudes of students toward people with intellectual disabilities using the AttitudesToward  Intellectual Disabilities Questionnaire (ATTID, 2013). Results from this study indicated that Level 1 Fieldwork significantly improved attitudes of OT students toward individuals with ID while lecture did not.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify a new assessment tool used to measure attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities, The Attitudes Toward Intellectual Disabilities Questionnaire (Morin, Crocker, Beaulieu-Bergeron & Caron, 2013).

2.      Understand how and why attitude is measured as a multifactorial construct on the ATTID, comprised of 5 factors, including:

a.     Knowledge of Rights

b.     Knowledge of Causes

c.     Interactions

d.     Sensitivity

e.     Discomfort

3.     Understand the impact that an on-campus Level I psychosocial fieldwork activity had on the attitudes of college students toward people with ID, as measured by the ATTID and why this suggests that fieldwork with members from this population should be offered early in educational programs and followed by subsequent experiences as students progress through their education.

 

B.    School Best Practice Strategies and Service Delivery Models

Presenters: Sharon A. Ray, ScD, OTR/L, Stony Brook University; Jan Hollenbeck, OTD, OTR/L; Medford Public Schools; Diane Blengs, MS, OTR/L; June Bunch, MS, OTR/L, MHA

Educational Level: Intermediate

Best practice supports an inclusive service delivery model. School occupational therapy practitioners report challenges implementing this model. This session will present service delivery models, strategies and next steps to minimize barriers and enhance provision of student supports/intervention within natural school contexts. An update on the 2nd Edition of the Guidelines for OT and PT in Massachusetts Public Schools will be provided and linked to session content.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify what the laws and current evidence say about service delivery models and differentiate between these and current district/building service delivery practices.

2.     Describe service delivery models that can support current regulations and best practices.

3.     Discuss and identify strategies that can be used to move toward more a more collaborative and contextual model of service delivery and develop next steps to take back to apply at the district or building level.

C Interprofessional Oral Health Education: Tools for Non-Dental Clinicians

Presenters:  Sharan L. Schwartzberg, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, CGP, FAGPA;  Ellen S. Patterson, MD, MA; Kathryn Colleran, OTS; Holly Fadie; Bailey Klein; Hanna Polshuk, OTS; Hayley Sacks; Ellen White, EdM, OTR/L; Tufts University  Boston School of Occupational Therapy and School of Dental Medicine

Educational Level: Introductory

Non-dental health care providers, especially occupational therapy practitioners, can play a key role in promoting the important connections between oral health and overall health and functioning. A panel comprised of Tufts faculty, students, and practitioners will explain their perspectives on the Tufts Medical Center interprofessional program. Practical advice will be given on the development of such programs and patient/client materials for a variety of populations. 

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify interprofessional strategies to address the oral health needs of individuals with mental health and other disabilities.

2.     Integrate key elements of a group oral health education intervention.

3.     Effectively utilize plain language oral health education materials.

 

D.  Poster Session

 

Adventure Group:  A Gross Motor Group for Pre-Kindergarteners

Presenters:  Samantha Lussier, OTS, Hannah Labansat, OTS; Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand the general format of the Adventure Group intervention.

2.     Describe the key mechanisms of action driving this and other successful gross motor interventions.

3.     Learn important tips for motivating and engaging pre-kindergarten students in a creative way.

Aquatic Therapy Group for Stroke Survivors

Presenters: Sari Pfeifer, MOT, OTR/L; Jeffrey Wilson-Braun, MS, OT/L; Leah Fenton, CTRS; Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital  

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.    Describe the benefits of aquatic therapy for stroke survivors and the value of therapy in a group setting.

2.    Identify adaptive equipment needed to facilitate participation and increase independence for stroke survivors in the water.

3.    Understand the requirements for creating an aquatic therapy group for stroke survivors. 

Assessing the Effectiveness of a Social Robot for People with Parkinson’s Disease through a Questionnaire and Video Analysis

Presenters:   

Meghmic Hacopian, OTS, Grace Nahyoung Lee, OTS, Annie Saechao, OTS, Difei Tong, OTS, Jason Wilson, MS, Matthias Scheutz, PhD, Linda Tickle-Degnen, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.      Describe how a robot can socially assist a person during a medication sorting task.

2.      Describe the methods used to assess the human-robot interaction during a medication sorting task.

3.      Describe how this study relates to OT practice.

 

Collaboration with Occupational Therapy:  Behavior Analysts’ Perceptions and Practices

Presenter: Linda MacDonald, OTD, OTR/L, Quinnipiac University

Educational Level:  Intermediate

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand how the cognitive maps of behavior analysts and occupational therapy practitioners influence collaborative outcomes.

2.     Understand the importance of confidently representing the profession in meetings with other disciplines.

3.     Understand the importance of knowing the scopes of practice and ethical codes of the other disciplines on your team.

 

Cues to Mood in People with Parkinson’s Disease

Presenters: Tondalaya Brainard, OTS; Jenna Eldridge, OTS; Rachel Henige, OTS;

Sophia Hur, OTS; Caitlin Sullivan, OTS; Sarah D. Gunnery, PhD; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.      Describe the utilized nonverbal cues for perception of mood in individuals with PD.

2.      Understand the relation between cues used to express and perceive mood in people with PD, as well as the correspondence of interpersonal judgments of mood for individuals with PD.

3.      Understand the effects of gender and facial masking on perceptions of mood for individuals with PD.

  

Encounters Between Youth with Developmental Disabilities and Environmental Factors:  Parents’ Identification and Reactions

Presenters: I-Ting Hwang, MSOT, Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand how parents describe youth’s encounter with environmental barriers.

2.     Identity the strategies parents and youth use to resolve environmental barriers to youth’s participation.

3.     Discuss the need for parents and youth to have a shared language.

 

Factors Impacting Leisure Preference Among Adults

Presenters: Amanda Holt, OTS; Arielle Danziger, OTS, RYT; Victoria Chaborek, OTS; Julie Marquardt, OTS; Beth Marfeo, PhD, MPH, OTR/L; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.  Understand how activities that are common amongst older adults fit within the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework.

2.   Describe factors that contribute to older adults participating in high demand leisure activities.

3.   Discuss the implications of considering favorite activities on the quality of life in older adults.

 

Grip and Pinch Strength’s Impact Lower Body Dressing

Presenter: James Clifford, COTA/L, OTS, Salem State University

Educational Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe how grip strength affects performance in lower body dressing tasks.

2.     Discuss the importance of grip and pinch strength and its impact on every day function.

3.     Identify appropriate pinch and lateral pinch prehensile patterns incorporated in lower body dressing. 

 

Group Leader Self Assessment:  Reliability and Validity

Presenters:  Mary Alicia Barnes, MS, OTR/L; Elizabeth Marfeo, PhD, MPH, OTR/L; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy

Educational Level:  Intermediate

Learning Objective By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify indicators of GLSA construct validity and reliability.

2.     Report GLSA internal consistency (Cronbach’s Alpha) and reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient).

3.     Discuss relationship of GLSA factor structure to group leader functions identified in seminal literature.

 

Helping Hands:  A Community Service Group for Older Adults 

Presenters:  Jessica DeMarinis, MSOT Candidate; Melissa Regan, MSOT Candidate; Fleeka Eder, OTR/L; Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Educational Level:  Intermediate

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe how mechanisms of action guided by theories of self-determination, psychosocial development, and social learning promoted client change on the targeted outcome areas.

2.     Describe recent evidence literature on the positive effects of volunteerism and reminiscence therapy in older adults.

3.     Participants will learn intervention features implemented in the first iteration of the group and how to reproduce them in their respective settings of practice.

 

How Does a Dementia Co-Morbidity Effect SNF Outcomes?

Presenter: Colleen Muse, OTR/L, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network.

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster program, participants will be able to:

1.     Demonstrate awareness of clinical research that can be performed as a practicing clinician and our process for data collecting.

2.     Identify demographic factors that correlate with LOS and discharge disposition of Medicare patients with a co-morbidity of dementia who are admitted for short term rehabilitation in a SNF setting.

3.     Describe how RUG level (amount of rehabilitation), falls and marital status affect LOS and discharge.

 

Ideational Praxis and Playfulness in Children

Presenters: Teresa A. May-Benson, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Caitlin Lauchlan, OTS; Christina Rogers, OTS; Hannah Polshuk, OTS; Monica Salazar, OTS; Sarah Sherman, OTS; Tufts University, Boston School of Occupational Therapy  

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe how ideational praxis performance on the Test of Ideational Praxis (TIP) relates to playfulness on the Test of Playfulness (ToP).

2.     Describe the TIP's ability to discriminate between children with and without ASD.

3.     Describe the relation of ideational skills and age.

  

Innovative Models to Increase Level I Fieldwork Capacity

Presenter: Mary E. Evenson, OTD, MPH, OTR/L, FAOTA; MGH Institute of Health Professions  

Educational Level:  Student/Introductory/Intermediate

Learning Objectives By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Recognize the purpose and goals of Level I fieldwork to support curricular content.

2.     Learn about innovative models for Level I fieldwork that can be applied to one's own setting.

3.     Understand how collaborative supervision and staggered scheduling dates can increase capacity to accommodate more fieldwork students.

 

Inter-Rater Reliability of the Test of Playfulness in Children with ASD

Presenters:  Teresa  A. May-Benson, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Julia Basiliere, OTS; Michaela Conway, OTS; Lucy Fox, OTS; Gwendolyn Niven, OTS; Alexa Violaris, OTS; Tufts University, Boston School of Occupational Therapy  

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to: 

1.     Describe the importance of playfulness on child development and describe difference components of playfulness.

2.     Identify differences in playfulness between children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

3.     State the importance of Inter-Rater Reliability (IRR) when testing with multiple raters, particularly when using the Test of Playfulness (ToP), as it involves many subjective components.

 

Self-Care Success:  OT Improves Function for Lower Limb Amputee Patients

Presenter:  Talia Mouldovan, OTR/L, ATP; Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     To explore the benefits and challenges of using the Melville Nelson Self-Care Assessment as a functional outcome measure.

2.     To explore the benefits of specific treatment interventions for improved functional performance and treatment planning for this population.

3.     To demonstrate the effectiveness of occupational therapy treatment for improving self-care performance and quality of life for adult patient’s post lower limb amputation.

 

Viewing the World Through a Telescope

Presenter:  Talia Mouldovan, OTR/L, ATP; Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital

Educational Level:  Intermediate

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand the key impairments of Balint’s Syndrome and its effect on functional performance.

2.     Understand ways to evaluate and differentiate Balint’s Syndrome from other diagnoses.

3.     Understand implementation of literature based on novel strategies for treatment of a patient with Balint’s syndrome. 

 

E.   The Matching Person & Technology Process to Identify Appropriate App Recommendations

Presenters: Karen Jacobs, Ed.D, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA; Amanda Nardone, OTS, CBIS; Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Educational Level: Introductory

Using case studies, this presentation will introduce the Matching Person & Technology (MPT) assessment process, which was created to provide a client-centered approach to matching individuals with appropriate technology.  Project Career, an interprofessional demonstration, was created to improve academic and employment outcomes for undergraduates with a TBI; and with the use of the MPT, consistently finds that technology combined with case management and mentoring can effectively support academic and career success for students with a TBI.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.  Identify Project Career’s components and best practice models used to provide

      effective Cognitive Support Technology (CST) and individualized career planning

      services to undergraduate students with Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI).

2.  Demonstrate how an iPad can be an appropriate CST for undergraduate students

      with TBI.

3.   Administer Matching Person & Technology assessments to make effective and

      appropriate iPad and app recommendations for undergraduate students with TBI.

 

F.  Community Transitions for Young Adults:  Farm to Table

Presenters Iris G. Leigh CAGS, OTR/L. Habilitation Assistance Corp and Bristol Community College; Jessica Lowe, COTA/L OTS; Habilitation Assistance Corp and NEIT

Educational Level:  Introductory

When young adults with developmental disabilities turn 22, they age out of school-based programs.  An OT/OTA team in a community day habilitation center transitioned young adults from schools to the center with a goal of increasing their independent living skills.  They designed an integrated program where clients grew vegetables, selected healthy-choice recipes, and cooked what they grew. These motivating activities focused on peer collaboration, skill building, organization and sequencing, and an understanding of the continuum of the food chain.   

      Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand the differences between school and habilitation goals and the need for targeted interventions for young adults with developmental disabilities.

2.     Develop a protocol for innovative independent living programs to transition young adults to community settings.

3.      Value the uniqueness and contributions of OT/OTA team members in the practice area of developmental disabilities.

 

G.  Lymphedema:  Restoring Function with Complete Decongestive Therapy

Presenter:  Holly Andrews, COTA/L, CLT; Spaulding Outpatient Center                                                                                                                               Educational Level: Introductory

Lymphedema occurs as a result of damage to the lymphatic system, causing swelling of the limbs. It is often seen in people who have had surgery for cancer, mostly commonly breast cancer. This condition can be treated, but not cured. A Certified Lymphatic Therapist who is properly trained in Complete Decongestive Therapy can treat Lymphedema, and help to restore function and meaning for clients with this debilitating condition.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Demonstrate knowledge of the Anatomy & Physiology of the human body’s  Lymphatic and Circulatory System.

2.     Define/Describe Lymphedema, it’s causes and symptoms.

3.     Describe Complete Decongestive Therapy and its  application to client care.

4.      Understand the professional value and the role of Occupational Therapy in treating clients with Lymphedema.

 

SESSION   II   1:30 PM - 2:30 PM 

 

A.   Sleep and Fatigue Self-Management:  Elders with Neurological Conditions                                                                                 Presenter:  Cailin Donahue, OTD, OTR/L; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Educational Level: Introductory    

This presentation describes a self-management approach for addressing “rest and sleep” problems in older adults with neurological conditions. Sleep difficulty and fatigue are common in this population. Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role in educating clients about these problems, sharing knowledge of evidence-based interventions for sleep hygiene and fatigue management, and guiding clients to identify strategies for managing and maximizing their energy. A workshop for people with Parkinson’s disease will serve as a model.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe assessment questions and screening tools used to identify sleep problems and fatigue severity in clients.

2.     Identify evidence-based interventions to address sleep problems and fatigue in older adults with neurological conditions.

3.     Discuss self-management strategies for sleep hygiene and fatigue management, based on a model workshop for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD).

4.      Reflect on how occupational therapy practitioners can incorporate interventions to address “rest and sleep” within their practice settings and across different populations.

 

B.  School-Based Telehealth:  Bringing Services to Any Child, Anywhere

Presenter:  Christian Hensen, OTR/L; Presence Learning

Educational Level: Introductory

Telehealth is an emerging practice area with the ability to bring services to any student, anywhere, and school children are reaping telehealth’s benefits!  See how activities traditional to onsite occupational therapy are utilized through telehealth as a remote occupational therapy practitioner is brought in live through her virtual therapy room to demonstrate what an online session looks like in real time.  Additionally, hear about the research showing the effectiveness of this innovative and emerging practice area with far-reaching potential.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe the benefits and limitations of telehealth and why it is being used in school-based settings.

2.     Visualize how telehealth works after having participated in a mock online session in an actual virtual therapy room.

3.     Identify the current research that supports the effectiveness of telehealth as a delivery model.

 

C.  Part 1 (30 minutes):  Bringing AT to Inpatient Rehab; Something for Everyone

Presenter:  Talia Mouldovan OTR/L, ATP 

Educational Level: Introductory

There are multiple ways to access and utilize technology however many people are not knowledgeable about what is available to them. Therapists don’t need to specialize in assistive technology to implement many alternate access methods. An inpatient assistive technology program can provide education to patients and their families as the first step to an improved quality of life. The presentation will discuss implementing a program and a variety of low cost and free interventions.  

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand the importance of initiating assistive technology education while in an inpatient setting.

2.     Learn a format for implementing an inpatient assistive technology program.

3.     Be able to implement a number of low cost and free assistive technology interventions.

 

Part 2 (30 minutes):  Validation of the Standardized Touchscreen Assessment of Cognition

Presenters:  Andrea D. Fairman, PhD, OTR/L, CPRP; Julianne Mitchell, BA, OT/s; Melanie Concordia, BS, OT/s; MGH Institute of Health Professions

Educational Level:  Introductory

This presentation will provide an overview of the Functional Standardized Touchscreen Assessment of Cognition (FSTAC), as well as share research about validating the STAC against the Cognitive Assessment of Minnesota (CAM) and the Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT).    

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Learn more about how iPads are being integrated into the field of occupational therapy.  

2.     Learn more about the FSTAC and how to administer it.

3.     Know how the FSTAC correlates with other assessments, specifically the CAM and the CLQT.

 

D.   Dual Identitites:  Exploring the Need for Both a Professional and Interprofessional Identity

Presenters:  Carol Gawyrs, DNP, RN; Jeramie Silveria, OTD, OTR/L; Jeanne Corcoran, OTD, OTR/L; Salem State University

Educational Level: Introductory

Many allied health programs have a goal of preparing students to work in communities, to understand how communities form, and especially how to identify resources and facilitate change in a community. This session will discuss the implementation of an interprofessional fieldwork opportunity developed at Salem State University in collaboration with North Shore Elder Services. This interprofessional fieldwork was designed to facilitate community development and improve the health of low income elders on the North Shore.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify the benefits and barriers of an interprofessional health promotion/community development fieldwork opportunity.

2.     Discuss strategies for teaching and curriculum design that help integrate community development, interprofessional health promotion and population management into the curriculum.

3.     Have an improved awareness of the valuable contributions and opportunities that exist for students to make an impact on the development of communities.

 

E.    How to Measure a Measure                                                                                                                                                                                          Presenters:  Laurie Cecchi, OTR/L; Christina Cole, MS, OTR/L; Genesis Rehab Services

Educational Level:  Introductory

Evidence based practice continues to be a quest of the occupational therapy practitioner in order to demonstrate value for the profession, as well as assist in the impairment identification and dosing of therapy interventions to achieve desired outcomes.  Objective measures are a key component in evidence based practice and this presentation seeks to demonstrate how to use an objective measure in occupational therapy service delivery.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand the role of objective measures in occupational therapy practice.

2.     Identify and utilize appropriate measures for identified patient impairments.

3.     Access objective measures that are appropriate for occupational therapy practitioners to use in service delivery.

 

F.   Interprofessional Education:  Promoting Role Identity, Professional Communication and Real World Skills in OT Students

Presenter: Cheryl B. Lucas, MS, OTR/L, CAGS, Worcester State University

Educational Level:  Introductory

IPE is a pedogological philosophy that combines the professional skills and knowledge of individual disciplines with a comprehensive and thoughtful understanding of issues from the perspectives of multiple team members (George, Renjith, & Renu, 2015; Williams, et.al. 2015).  In the helping professions, the goal of IPE is to promote communication, teamwork, collaboration and understanding of other professions in order to promote client centered care (Williams, 2015).  This presentation/workshop will include a model of IPE used with occupational therapy/communication disorders/special education and school psychology  students at Worcester State University.  The process of developing IPE opportunities in a current OT curriculum, overcoming barriers and obstacles, and preparating students for real world experiences will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Communicate the goals of Inter-professional education and it’s relationship to quality and patient centered care.

2.     Communicate the benefits of Inter-professional education for OT students prior to entering fieldwork.

3.     Identify topic areas in their own curriculum that could be taught in an IPE model.

 

G.    Transitioning Medically Complex Patients from Long Term Care to the Community

Presenter:  Ashley Harmon, OTR/L, RehabCare                                                                                                                           

Educational Level: Intermediate

This presentation will outline occupational therapy’s role treating medically complex populations and assisting in the transition from long term care to community environments. The presentation will review how occupational therapy practitioners are uniquely equipped to assess function across the continuum of care and promote engagement healthy routines. The presentation will explore occupational therapy’s role during the discharge planning process and the importance of utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to facilitate successful community reintegration after prolonged stays in medical facilities. The end of the presentation will conclude with a question and answer period for audience members to ask questions or share comments/solutions they’ve found in their practice settings. Lastly, this presenter will provide audience members with resources for future practice.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

  • 1.  Describe occupational therapy’s role in treating medically complex populations.
  • 2.  Discuss why it is important to utilize an interdisciplinary approach with clients after long term care.

 

H.  New Occupational Therapy Evaluation Codes and the Code Change Process  

 Presenter:  Deborah Yarett Slater, MS, OT/L, FAOTA,  American Occupational Therapy Association                                                                                                 

Educational Level: Intermediate

Attendees will learn the details of the new occupational therapy evaluation codes that are effective January 1, 2017 and how to appropriately select the level of complexity to reflect the scope of evaluation performed.   We will review the status of AOTA’s CPT Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) code change proposal, learn the underlying rationale for proposed changes, and discuss the current status of the proposal through the American Medical Association (AMA) process to add/change codes in the CPT Manual. 

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand the criteria in the new  OT evaluation codes and how to select the appropriate code to reflect the  level of complexity of the evaluation performed.

2.     Understand the CPT code revision process from description through valuation for reimbursement.

3.     Describe the status of AOTA’s CPT Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) code change proposals for Intervention Codes. 

SESSION III 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

 

ACustom Seating for Wheelchairs, From Simple to Complex

Presenters:  Mary Jo Wagner, OTR/L, ATP; Spaulding Rehab Hospital and Department of Developmental Services; Kim Davis, MSPT, ATP, Sunrise Medical

 Educational Level:  Intermediate

This presentation will provide an overview of seating product options for the wheelchair user.  The full continuum of seat and backrest categories will be described, from basic to complex, with product examples on hand.  Participants will be walked through the clinical rationale process of matching client needs to product features. Course content will highlight different custom seating options followed by opportunity for participants to create a backrest using foam-in-place.

      Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe the difference between seating products which are individually configurable versus fully custom seating.

2.     Describe a minimum of three seat cushion coding categories, as defined by Medicare’s Local Coverage Determination.

3.     Demonstrate understanding of the steps needed for foam-in-place seating, via participating in a custom foam-in-place backrest fabrication.

 

 

B. Part 1 (30 minutes):  Connecting Through Communication and Empathetic Listening

Presenter:  Katrin Meret Bastos, OTS, Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy                                                 

Educational Level: Introductory

This presentation introduces participants to compassionate communication based on Marshall Rosenberg’s work in Non-Violent Communication¬© and how it can be applied to occupational therapy. The presentation is based on a project at Tufts University during a Post-Professional Master’s program. Research supports that this communication tool can benefit collaboration, self-care and therapeutic relationships. Additionally, compassionate communication supports the occupational therapy practitioner in the use of a strengths-based approach as the perspectives of the clients are particularly emphasized.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand the theoretical model of compassionate communication.

2.     Name the basic four steps in compassionate communication.

3.     Discuss the different areas where compassionate communication can be beneficial in occupational therapy.

 Part 2 (1 hour): Creating Opportunities in Pediatric Mental Health

Presenters:  Andrea D. Fairman, PhD, OTR/L, CPRP; Eriana Jade Buteau, OTS;  Victoria Seman, OTS; MGH Institute of Health Professions

Educational Level:  Intermediate

Occupational therapy practitioners can provide families and children with education and strategies for healthier and more functional family routines such as: sleep hygiene, coping skills, behavior modification techniques and structured sensory-based interventions. Occupational therapy practitioners’ delivery of pediatric mental health services can also utilize a preventative approach to lessen or prevent future mental health concerns. This session shares a novel approach to meeting the needs of families while providing OT students with unique learning experiences.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify the unique ways occupational therapy practitioners can actively contribute in community-based mental health services.

2.     Understand potential processes for program development in collaboration with academic institutions.

3.     Learn about the outcomes two programs developed and delivered within the context of an academic setting in collaboration with community partners.

 

C. Pediatric Oral Motor Interventions for Feeding
Presenter: Kate Barlow, OTD, MS, OTR/L, American International College                                                                                                               Educational Level:  Intermediate

This presentation provides useful treatment strategies that you can use on Monday with your pediatric caseload. Presentation will discuss specific oral motor treatment strategies, through the use of videos, to improve feeding.   Learn how to identify oral motor deficits contributing to the underweight pediatric population, as well as why some children have food refusal. This presentation is targeted for children ages 12 months to 12 years.                                                    

 Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify and treat children with dysphagia.

2.     Identify which muscles to target for oral motor interventions.

3.     Learn specific interventions for oral motor deficit areas.

4.     Understand causes for food refusal and how to improve clinical observations.

 

D.   Promoting Leadership and Ethics in Occupational Therapy:  An Interactive Discussion Using Case Vignettes and Role Play

Presenters: Kimberly Erler, MS, OTR/L, Massachusetts General Hospital, MGH Institute of Health Professions; Sarah McKinnon, MS, OTR/L, BCPR, MPA, Boston University Sargent College, Massachusetts General Hospital

Educational Level:  Introductory

Leadership and ethics are critical components of empowering clinicians and fostering healthy practice environments. This presentation will review leadership theories and the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (AOTA, 2015) to provide participants with a strong background of literature, resources, opportunities, and strategies. Next, we will transition into an interactive session using case vignettes and role plays which will provide participants with the opportunity to apply leadership strategies, ethical reasoning, and communication strategies. This dynamic experience will enhance a participant’s ability to promote leadership and ethics in OT practice and furthermore strengthen his or her role as an advocate for the profession of occupational therapy.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Participants will identify the literature and resources supporting leadership and ethics in OT practice.

2.     Participants will apply leadership and communication strategies during simulated clinical activity and discuss application to various settings.

3.     Participants will demonstrate ethical decision making by integrating the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics during simulated clinical activity and will discuss application to various settings.

 

E.  Part 1 (30 minutes)  Emergency Preparedness and Occupational Therapy.

Presenter:   Tamara Barboza, M.S.Healthcare Emergency Management Boston University

Educational Level:  Introductory

Disasters and emergencies can occur at any time, but being prepared for an emergency greatly effects the way an individual responds. Whichever the type of disaster, it is crucial for all individuals to be prepared, including those with disabilities. Through having an individualized emergency preparedness kit, individuals with a disability will have a better response to disasters. It is also important for those who require assistance to familiarize themselves with available services, programs, government agencies and organizations that provide emergency preparedness and disaster recovery assistance.

Occupational therapists guide clients in becoming independent through providing resources and adaptive equipment to complete tasks of the daily living. These tasks may include skills such as self care, motor planning, communication, the list goes on.  An occupational therapist has the knowledge and creativity to recommend what items an individual with disabilities requires to survive an emergency.

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, the participant will be able to:

1.     Describe types of disasters:  Natural, Biological, Chemical, Man-made

2.     Understand what an emergency kit should contain and tailor a kit for an individual with disabilities to be independent during a disaster.

3.     Describe resources (local and government).

4.  Describe how occupational therapists already contribute to emergency preparedness.

E. Part 2 (1 hour):  Developing the PEDI-PRO:  Innovative Youth Self-Report Software

Presenters:  Ariel Schwartz, MS, OTR/L;  Jessica Kramer, PhD, OTR/L; PEDI-PRO Youth Team; Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Educational Level:  Intermediate

Occupational therapy practitioners use self-reports to facilitate client-centered practice. However, few self-reports are appropriate for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). We will describe how a team of researchers and youth with I/DD collaborated to design an easy to use self-report assessment software: the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-PRO (PEDI-PRO). We will report results evaluating the usability and validity of the PEDI-PRO questions with over 100 youth with I/DD, and discuss implications for practice.

 Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, the participant will be able to:

1.     Describe how the PEDI-PRO assessment software uses participation in everyday activities to assess functional abilities in three domains: Social/Cognitive, Daily Activities, and Mobility.

2.     Describe how youth with I/DD, of varying ages and abilities, can effectively use the PEDI-PRO to self-report their functional abilities in a valid manner.

3.     Understand how youth with I/DD can collaborate in the development of occupational therapy assessments.

 

F.  Poster Session

 

FGM Leadership Assessment Checklist:  Observation Tool Development

Presenters: Sharan L. Schwartzberg, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, CGP, FAGPA; Christopher DeLorenzo, OTS; Hannah Koch, OTS; Kirsten Prue, OTS; John Read, OTS; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.  Identify the four forms of action central to the Functional Group Model.

2.  Identify degree to which the tool appears to demonstrate inter-rater agreement.

3.  Describe the importance of leader adherence to models and assessing consistency thereto.

 

Get Ready to Learn Yoga Program and Attention

 Presenter:  Laura Ventura COTA/L, OTS; Salem State University                                                                                                                   

 Educational Level:  Introductory                                                                                                                                                                                                      

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe the connection between yoga and occupational therapy intervention.

2.     Identify the overall physiological benefits of yoga.

3.     Describe why children with developmental delay need interventions when they go to school.

 

Online Peer Mentoring:  A Fruitful 10 Year Journey

Presenters: Erika Kemp, MS, OTR/L, Ohio State University; Shannon Levandowski, OTD, OTR, BCP, SCSS; Texas Woman’s University; Karen Jacobs, EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA. Boston University; Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences                                                        

Educational Level:  Intermediate

Learning Objectives: By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Explore mentoring experiences and professional outcomes reached through mentorship.

2.     Discuss the elements identified in a successful peer e-mentor relationship.

3.       Explore a successful peer e-mentor relationship through discussion.

 

Open Style Lab:  An Interprofessional Approach to Creating Adaptive Clothing

Presenters: Loren Fields, OTS; Hana Rovin, OTS; Regina Doherty, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA, FNAP; MGH Institute of Health Professions

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:   By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Learn about the interdisciplinary work conducted by fashion designer, engineering, and occupational therapy students, and the process of using the individual strengths of each discipline to create a functional clothing prototype for a client.

2.     Explore two clothing design prototypes created for clients with chronic conditions that demonstrate how adaptive modifications allow for participation in social and work activities across various environmental contexts.

3.     Recognize the importance of collaborating with clients to create clothing that meets sensory and motor functions and aligns with personal values and preferences for style.

 

Promoting Competent Communuity Interaction Among Adolescents with Disabilities

Presenters: Kalena B. Lopez, OTS; Diana J. Smith, OTS; Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify practical applications of theories discussed as they apply to the group intervention.

2.     Describe the group intervention.

3.     Identify concrete ways to apply recommendations to future group interventions.

 

Promoting Healthy Living in Adults with Mental Illness

Presenters: Briana Toegemann, BS, MSOT Candidate; Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.   Describe the importance of health promotion when working with individuals with serious mental illness.

2.   Describe how to design a group intervention to promote health for individuals with serious mental illness.

3.  Describe how to lead or co-lead an occupation based group intervention to promote health for individuals with serious mental illness.

 

Quality of Life, Community Dwelling Elders, & Pets

Presenter: Heather Bannon COTA/L, OTS; Salem State University

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify two potential health benefits of companion animals. 

2.     Explain the occupation, care of pet.

 

Responsiveness and Discriminative Validity of the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP) in US Children and Youth with Traumatic Brain Injury  Across a 3-Year Period

Presenters: Gary Bedell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy;  Anat Golos, PhD. OT; Hadassah and the Hebrew University School of Occupational Therapy

Educational Level:  Introduction

Learning Objectives By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Demonstrate knowledge about the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP) and its use and evidence for children and youth with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and other conditions.

2.     Understand study results about the CASP’s responsiveness to change and discriminant validity over a three year period for children and youth with TBI.

3.     Understand the potential and limitations of the study results for informing research and practice decisions for children and youth withTBI over a 3-year period.

 

Responsiveness of the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP) items in Youth with Traumatic Brain Injury 

Presenters: Kathryn Colleran, OTS; Kelly Kirschner, OTS; Michelle Moser, OTS; Matthew Rousseau, OTS; Gary Bedell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Determine the responsiveness of the items of the CASP for youth with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) over a 3-year period.

2.     Describe the patterns of change in participation over time according to the CASP, and compare the patterns of the four domains (Home, Community, School, and Home and Community Living) over time.

3.     Understand the ways in which the CASP results might inform us about trajectories of youth with TBI and help to identify new areas for allocation of potential resources.

 

Self-Efficacy and Participation Among Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

Presenter:  Lorimer Kaplan, COTA/L, OTS; Salem State University

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Define self-efficacy and its relevance to the occupational therapy profession.

2.     Describe how self-efficacy influences participation in meaningful life activities.

3.     Verbalize how participation in meaningful activity among individuals with spinal cord injury impacts their quality of life.

 

Sensorimotor Activities and their Role in Fall Prevention

Presenter:  Kimberly Boutin, COTA/L

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.      Identify how falls impact older adults.

2.     Understand the effects fear of falling has on older adults.

3.     Understand what sensorimotor activities are and how they may improve function in older adults.

 

Social Participation and Navigation (SPAN):  Usability Testing of an App-Based Coaching Intervention for Teenagers with Traumatic Brain Injury

Presenters:  Gary Bedell, Ph.D, OTR/L, FAOTA; Michele Jacquin, BS, OTS; Sally Anne Marie Cocjin, BS, OTS; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy 

Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     To become more knowledgeable about Social Participation And Navigation (SPAN): an app-based coaching intervention initially designed for teenagers with traumatic brain injuries (TBI).

2.     To understand study results about the feasibility and preliminary effects of SPAN in this shortened 4-week usability trial conducted with 4 teenagers with TBI paired with 4 college student coaches  

3.     To understand the potential and limitations of the study results for informing revisions that were made for a subsequent larger implementation trial conducted with teenagers with TBI and brain tumors. 

 

Socially Assistive Robot Development: A Content Validation Study

Presenters:  Michele Bokun, B.S. ; Shawna Carpenter, B.A.; Joanna Kornstein, B.A.; Laura Steinmetz, B.A.; Samantha Tavender, B.S.; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy 

Educational Level:  Intermediate

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe the content validity of a medication sorting task for use with socially assistive robots.

2.     Identify how occupational therapy activity analysis is used for developing specifications for robotic software.

3.     Increase awareness of the importance of medication sorting for occupational therapy interventions for Parkinson’s Disease.

 

The Lived Experience of Sports-Related Concussion on the College Student

Presenter:  Julia Caruso, OTS; Worcester State University

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Understand how the physical and emotional symptoms of a sports-related concussion effects the lives roles of the college student.

2.     Describe the unique barriers to recovery in the college student following a sports-related concussion.

3.     Articulate the role of an occupational therapy practitioner on the college campus prior to and following a sports-related concussion.

 

The Means of Coping with College Anxiety

Presenters:  Allison Doucette, COTA/L, OTS; at Jeffery and Susan Brudnick Center for Living 

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Verbalize the importance of occupational therapy’s role in the management of anxiety and anxiety disorders.

2.     Identify the intervention strategies that are recommended by occupational therapy practitioners to treat people with mental health conditions like anxiety.

3.     Recall two formal assessments that can be used to identify the coping strategies of a person with anxiety.

 

The Use of Heavy Work to Increase On-Task Behavior

Presenters:  Danielle DeLisio COTA/L, OTS; Salem State University 

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Demonstrate increased understanding on how ADHD impacts on-task behaviors and academic performance.

2.     Demonstrate an understanding of the use of sensory heavy work activities to increase on-task behaviors in children. 

 

Urban Farm Kitchen:  Impact on Food Preferences, Attitudes and Behaviors

 Presenter Jennifer Amador, OTS; Angela Castaldo, OTS; Charlotte Huson, OTS; Allison Phillips, OTS; Vicki Shopland, OTS; Alexis Daniels, MS, OTR/L, Director of Teaching Kitchen (YMCA), Research Mentor; Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Develop understanding of Urban Farm Kitchen phase I intervention rationale, logic model, study design, and role for occupational therapy practitioners in community-based nutrition programs.

2.     Describe pre-post program impact, with regard to fruit and vegetable preferences, cooking attitudes, self-efficacy, and willingness to try new foods among intervention and control groups.

3.   Understand challenges surrounding data collection, including discrepancies between child and parent reported food neophobia scores and cooking habits, and suggestions for future research.

 

Using Nintendo Wii Balance Board Standing Activities to Increase Functional Standing Balance for Activities of Daily Living Following Hip Fracture or Replacement

Presenters:  Steven Massero, COTA/L, OTS; Salem State University

Educational Level:  Introductory

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this poster presentation, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe how hip fractures, surgeries, and replacements decrease functional standing balance.

2.     Describe how functional standing balance correlates with successful participation and completion of ADL tasks.

3.      Describe how activities on the Nintendo Wii Balance Board can potentially improve functional standing balance following hip fracture, surgery, or replacement.

 

G.  Part 1 (30 minutes):  Providing an Enhanced Program to CNA’s to Enhance Engagement with Clients with Dementia

PresenterHeather Gierej, OTR/L; Genesis Healthcare

Educational Level:  Introductory

This presentation will address the use of enhanced training techniques with caregivers working with the dementia and Alzheimer’s disease population.

      Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Identify components of the Home Environmental Skill-Building Program.

2.     Understand value of enhanced staff training.

3.     Analyze CNA perceptions of enhanced training on client engagement.

 

Part 2 (1 hour):  Occupational Therapy and the Dizzy Patient

PresenterMeredith Grinnell MS, OTR/L, CBIS; Pauline Fiorello OTR/L CBIS; Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Outpatient

Educational Level:  Introductory

This presentation will focus on a top-down approach when working with individuals reporting dizziness, imbalance and visual disturbances following a brain injury by using current examples and strategies used in an outpatient clinic. 

Learning Objectives:  By the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1.     Describe the impact of vestibular disturbance on activities of daily living. 

2.     Discuss strategies incorporating modification of tasks or environment.

3.     Discuss and advocate for occupational therapy to be a member of the treatment team, demonstrating our distinct value.

 

MAOT - Massachusetts Association for Occupational Therapy, Inc.
57 Madison Road, Waltham, MA  02453 - Phone: 781.647.5556 - Email: info@maot.org

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